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GE to supply power generation equipment for Kuwait’s Sabiya Power Plant

EBR Staff Writer Published 19 April 2017

GE has been awarded the supply contract for a steam turbine generator set and two heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) for the $2.8bn Sabiya Power Plant in Kuwait.

The American multinational conglomerate which has been given the contract by the Kuwaiti Ministry of Electricity will also provide the related engineering and other services for the plant. 

GE’s supply of equipment will help the Sabiya Power Plant to convert from simple-cycle to combined-cycle configuration thereby generating over 260MW of additional power without consuming extra fuel.

The additional power generated from the plant is expected to meet the average energy requirements of over 100,000 homes in Kuwait.

GE gas power systems sales president & CEO Ghassan Barghout said: “GE is committed to driving power sector efficiency across Kuwait and helping the Ministry of Electricity meet the increasing demand for power for domestic, industrial and municipal use.

“By adding onto non-GE legacy systems at the facility, our steam tail technology will help enhance output and lower both the life cycle costs, as well as the emissions generated per megawatt of electricity produced at the Sabiya Power Plant.”

GE has stated that the HRSGs for the plant will be dispatched from Korea and are likely to arrive to their destination by the third quarter of next year.

After which, they will be erected and operated on the backend of gas turbines of non-GE F-class that are presently operational at the power plant.

The HRSG units are being manufactured by GE at its facilities acquired from Doosan.

According to GE, its proposed acquisition of Doosan Engineering & Construction’s HRSG business in August last year is enabling it to cater to the increasing demand for its combined-cycle power plant solutions.